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An Imaginary Tetrahedron is a mostly-nonexistent tetrahedron, which uses forces to hold positions of universes. It is actually a 4-simplex due to its dimensionality.

Only the vertices are existent to us, as every point is a sphere made of Interuniversal metal, with a size of ~25 billion light years. These vertices transfer Imaginary Energy through edges, and can generate rainbow gases with dense Imaginary Energy, as more dense substances can be found closer to a vertex. There is also a big square behind all edges, that glows bright cyan.

Due to the vertices being made of Interuniversal metals, all Imaginary Tetrahedrons have to be made by Darismuth-level civilizations or beyond.

How Imaginary Tetrahedrons work

This object can only be powered by Imaginary Energy from all edges that form a single face, or else it never works, allowing universes to move freely outside.

When one universe passes through a face of Imaginary Tetrahedron, some forces are activated using Imaginary Energy. Those forces try to hold universes in place by converting momentum (kinetic energy) into Imaginary Energy. The momentums reflect back until a universe is held in place or escapes.

These holding forces are like dark energy, which expands universes. However, the expansion these forces cause creates momentum. Since dark energy can't be created with Imaginary Energy, this is probably a reason why Imaginary Tetrahedrons are multiversal generators. However, if the expansion rate is too fast, then a universe will inflate even more, causing a Big Rip scenario.

Universes bigger than an Imaginary Tetrahedron can destroy them in one hit. Also, if it occupies a Darismuth's System, then forces generated by a Darismuth Universe would destroy it.

Properties of containment

Imaginary Tetrahedrons can hold universes up to the biggest-possible radius, which is the half of Imaginary Tetrahedron. Universes can easily escape if there isn't enough empty space. In fact, universes can be easily clustered together to form Terminal Spheres.

Universes smaller than ours have a higher chance of getting held, but 15% of universes larger than ours are successfully held by Imaginary Tetrahedrons.

Connections between Universes are often dissolved by Imaginary Tetrahedrons, transforming the cluster into a Terminal Sphere.

Comparison to Imaginary Dodecahedron

Imaginary Tetrahedrons don't spin at all, and momentum is converted into Imaginary Energy here.

See also

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